Modulate the pace of your speech in the precincts of Westport.

Over the past decade, ever since we learned of their existence, we have a great deal of fun exploring (and possibly even more fun with) the core tenets underlying the most successful hedge fund of all time, the Life and Management Principles of one Raymond Dalio. We’ve looked at the importance of probing deep and hard; who, precisely, is entitled to an opinion and how that should be measured; that people should not be let off the hook, they should be evaluated accurately as opposed to kindly, and how firing them is totally not a big deal; how the truth is nothing to be feared, and radical transparency embraced (usually); the need for synthesis and continuous diagnosis; that criticism is to be welcomed and encouraged, except when acting as a slimy weasel; and, of course, the matter of hyenas and wildebeests: which you should aspire to be, and which you should aspire to kill and eat.

But we haven’t even scratched the surface. Like any good book, Principles repays repeated visits. There are 210 of these things, many with lettered sub-principles. And CNBC has chosen to highlight one of the lesser-known corollaries to one of the lesser-known principles, and we thank them for it.

“Fast talkers are people who articulately and assertively say things faster than they can be assessed as a way of pushing their agenda past other people’s examination or objections,” Dalio tweeted in August….

“Fast talking can be especially effective when it is used against people worried about appearing stupid,” Dalio writes.

“Recognize that it is your responsibility to make sense of things and don’t move on until you do. If you’re feeling pressured, say something like, ‘Sorry for being stupid, but I’m going to need to slow you down so I can make sense of what you’re saying,’” Dalio recommends. “Then ask your questions. All of them.”

Ray Dalio: Be careful of ‘fast talkers’ – they’re trying to bulldoze you [CNBC]

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